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Flyfisher's Guide to the Florida Keys (Wilderness Adventures Flyfishing Guidebook)

$29.95


Louis Cahill Photography » Florida Keys Fly Fishing

Saltwater fly fishing isn’t always about sun-baked flats kissed by light winds, and bathed by sparkling warm water and battalions of tailing fish. Sometimes Florida fly fishers have to literally run for cover once December cold front winds arrive. But there are some good alternatives to getting blown out on wide-open flats, inshore bays or out in blue water.

The Florida Keys Fly Fishing School has been in operation for 25 years and has helped thousands of beginner and veteran anglers learn to saltwater fly fish. Their 5-day-long courses include socializing, learning and fishing with experienced guides and instructors. Two entire days are spent in the classroom learning every aspect of saltwater fly fishing: proper tackle, casting techniques, fly tying and everything in between. After the classroom, put your newfound skills to the test and spend the next two days fishing for the backcountry species of Islamorada, Florida. Read more about

Florida Panhandle Fly Fishing Charters

Sam Root of Salty Shores joined one of our classes and produced and uploaded this short look at the Florida Fly Fishing School’s experience..

Northwest Florida Fly Fishing Tarpon

The Florida Keys Fly Fishing School has been in operation for 25 years and has helped thousands of beginner and veteran anglers learn to saltwater fly fish. Their 5-day-long courses include socializing, learning and fishing with experienced guides and instructors. Two entire days are spent in the classroom learning every aspect of saltwater fly fishing: proper tackle, casting techniques, fly tying and everything in between. After the classroom, put your newfound skills to the test and spend the next two days fishing for the backcountry species of Islamorada, Florida.

Saltwater fly fishing isn’t always about sun-baked flats kissed by light winds, and bathed by sparkling warm water and battalions of tailing fish. Sometimes Florida fly fishers have to literally run for cover once December cold front winds arrive. But there are some good alternatives to getting blown out on wide-open flats, inshore bays or out in blue water.