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High Quality Steel Steel Fly Fish Fishing Hook

JSHANMEI 350pcs/box Silver Fly Hooks Long Shank Streamer Fly Tying Fishing Hooks Set

$35.99


Gamakatsu Fishing Hooks > Fly Fishing Hooks

When you think about hook size, you may think of shank length more than anything. The shank of the hook allows you to create longer and more substantial flies by tying the materials over the available room on the hook. The proportion of the natural that you are trying to imitate usually determines how long of a shank you want. The problem is that hooks can come in various shank lengths even with the same number designation. For example, a #8 hook can be #8 2x long, 3x short, 4x long. This means that you can literally have a #6 6x hook that can be used to tie a fly as equally as big as a #8/0 big game hook. There are ten steps in between these two hooks (6, 4, 2, 1, 1/0, 2/0, 3/0, 4/0, 5/0, 6/0, 7/0, 8/0), but the fly would be the exact same size if measured with a ruler, i.e., the shanks are nearly equal in size. This is an extreme example, but this fact exists at all levels of fly size, and it gets really important when you use a few hooks of different shank sizes for one particular fly. Of course, shank size is not the only feature to think about, it’s the combination of all the features (just like the physics rules) that make up the overall fly fishing hook size.

There is one other main feature that shapes fly fishing hook size, hook thickness. Hook thickness is technically a part of fly fishing hook size although it isn’t as noticeable when compared to shank and gap size. There are three main reasons to pay attention to hook thickness. 1) The smaller the diameter, the easier a hook penetrates and thus goes into the fish’s mouth. The best example is a mosquito or a tick’s proboscis, which you most often can’t feel when it penetrates your skin. Depth has something to do with this as well, but do you want a knife blade or a syringe needle taking blood from you? The smaller needle penetrates much more easily—and painlessly. There is more at play with hook penetration than the diameter of your hook, but this is a huge factor nonetheless. 2) The thicker the diameter of a similar material the faster it sinks. If you are fishing in shallow water, you don’t usually want a fly that sinks like a rock unless you are presenting the fly from the bottom. 3) The thicker the hook, all things being equal, the more pressure you can put on a fish when playing it. The practicality of this should be somewhat obvious.

Mustad Fly Fishing Hooks - TackleDirect

type:
fly fishing snap hook

High Quality Steel Steel Fly Fish Fishing Hook

There is one other main feature that shapes fly fishing hook size, hook thickness. Hook thickness is technically a part of fly fishing hook size although it isn’t as noticeable when compared to shank and gap size. There are three main reasons to pay attention to hook thickness. 1) The smaller the diameter, the easier a hook penetrates and thus goes into the fish’s mouth. The best example is a mosquito or a tick’s proboscis, which you most often can’t feel when it penetrates your skin. Depth has something to do with this as well, but do you want a knife blade or a syringe needle taking blood from you? The smaller needle penetrates much more easily—and painlessly. There is more at play with hook penetration than the diameter of your hook, but this is a huge factor nonetheless. 2) The thicker the diameter of a similar material the faster it sinks. If you are fishing in shallow water, you don’t usually want a fly that sinks like a rock unless you are presenting the fly from the bottom. 3) The thicker the hook, all things being equal, the more pressure you can put on a fish when playing it. The practicality of this should be somewhat obvious.

When it’s all said and done, fly fishing hook size comes down to the specifics of a given hook and brand. The best way to figure out if a hook is perfect for your fly is to gain experience yourself by examining various hooks. You can also call on experts and guides to give you recommendations. You might examine a few recipes of fly patterns that guides post on their websites, or you can email them and ask what specific hooks they like and in what sizes. Even with this approach, you can still do better than guides in some instances. Take what they tell you, and improve on or follow their advice for a particular body of water.