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Tobiko Flying Fish Roe Sushi

Tobico Capelin Caviar Red - 8 oz

$14.04


“It’s flying fish roe!” I would always say.

Tobiko Flying Fish Roe is slightly sweet in flavor with a mild salty overtone. While Orange is the natural color of Tobiko, it has become popular to season the small Fish Roe with a variety of different flavors and add color to identify the intensity of the various varieties. For example, the yellow colored Tobiko typically has a ginger flavor; the orange and black a somewhat salty flavor. Black Tobiko Flying Fish Roe gets its black color from squid ink.

One such wafu dish that I adored at Basta Pasta is , which is spaghetti with tobiko (flying fish roe), julienned shiso (a minty Japanese herb), and a butter and garlic sauce. The tobiko are like little bubbles–it adds an unexpected texture since it pops as you chew; its flavor is mild and slightly sweet. The shiso adds an herbal minty brightness. This dish is the inspiration for my version of the recipe (To my knowledge, Basta Pasta has not published their recipe). Keeping with this dish’s Italian-Japanese theme, my sauce is a mix of Japanese ingredients and Italian ingredients–garlic, butter, sake, and dashi. It looks light, but it actually has a lot of butter in it; this is important for getting a full rich flavor. At the end of cooking, it is accented by a small amount of lemon juice, just enough to add brightness and sparkle but not enough to make the lemony flavor noticeable.

flying fish roe in different flavour---red, orange, black, wasabi

Sushi - Sushi Menu - Flying Fish Roe Sushi

The flying fish roe has a deep golden color. When clumped together, they increase in red hue and look more orange. After the flying fish roes are removed from the fish, they are separated from their casings and salted for a few hours. Unfortunately, some low grade flying fish roes that are faint in color have artificial food coloring added to make them look more orange, or green (marketed as wasabi tobiko).

Individual roes are very small, and the membrane is tougher than the salmon roe. They “pop” in your mouth when they are chewed, and many people enjoy the texture of it. It doesn’t have a strong aroma, but has a slight dry aftertaste. For its rather clear taste, no special preparations are done; salt curing is enough to quickly release extra moisture and concentrate the flavors. Soy sauce is usually not necessary for the flying fish roe sushi.

Complete Tutorial on: How to Make Sushi

Popular style for flying fish roe sushi: Ship Roll (Gunkanmaki)
Popular condiments for flying fish sushi:Wasabi
Category: Roe

Wasabi Flying Fish RoeOrigin: Fujian China Wasabi Flying Fish Roe

One such wafu dish that I adored at Basta Pasta is , which is spaghetti with tobiko (flying fish roe), julienned shiso (a minty Japanese herb), and a butter and garlic sauce. The tobiko are like little bubbles–it adds an unexpected texture since it pops as you chew; its flavor is mild and slightly sweet. The shiso adds an herbal minty brightness. This dish is the inspiration for my version of the recipe (To my knowledge, Basta Pasta has not published their recipe). Keeping with this dish’s Italian-Japanese theme, my sauce is a mix of Japanese ingredients and Italian ingredients–garlic, butter, sake, and dashi. It looks light, but it actually has a lot of butter in it; this is important for getting a full rich flavor. At the end of cooking, it is accented by a small amount of lemon juice, just enough to add brightness and sparkle but not enough to make the lemony flavor noticeable.

Some people may argue that the Flying Fish roe is rich in cholesterol but we would like to assure you that the amount of the Tobiko consumed in a standard sushi helping is just a 1/17 of the acceptable everyday quantity of this element and the general wholesome qualities of the Flying Fish caviar completely surpasses its possible harm to a human body.