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Premio come miglior film The Summer of Flying Fish di Marcela Said

PHIL ROSENTHAL - indian summer FLYING FISH 078 (LP vinyl record)

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‘The Summer of Flying Fish’ | Variety

A bourgeois Chilean family spend summer at their lakeside estate in this atmospheric drama, which is playing in the Directors’ Fortnight in Cannes. The narrative feature debut of former documentary director Marcela Said, The Summer of Flying Fish is full of arresting images of Chilean nature – ghostly morning mist, lapping waves, armies of moths, steam-shrouded hot springs. The story is shot through with class and racial friction, but falls short of the angry social polemic or politically charged horror movie hinted at in its pressure-cooker mood and creepy backwoods setting. Further festival bookings seem likely, but the localized context and opaque narrative will be a tough sell to overseas audiences.

After building up a powerful sense of creeping dread and imminent disaster, The Summer of Flying Fish never quite galvanizes itself into a concrete narrative. Instead it settles into a series of impressionistic tableaux, leaving viewers to infer rather too much from thinly sketched characters and obscure motivations. This is disappointing as Said and her cinematographer Inti Briones clearly share a strong visual eye and a subtle mastery of unsettling mood. But their sophisticated aesthetic deserves to deliver a smarter pay-off message than just another sour insider’s portrait of the indiscreet, charmless bourgeoisie.

The Summer of Flying Fish (2013) - Movie | Moviefone

  • A Fish
  • Bruno Bettati
  • Cannes Film Festival
  • Fishing
  • Flying
  • Marcela Said
  • Summer
  • Summer Movies
  • The Mist
  • The Summer of Flying Fish
  • Wide Sphere Films

The Summer Of Flying Fish | Reviews | Screen

After building up a powerful sense of creeping dread and imminent disaster, The Summer of Flying Fish never quite galvanizes itself into a concrete narrative. Instead it settles into a series of impressionistic tableaux, leaving viewers to infer rather too much from thinly sketched characters and obscure motivations. This is disappointing as Said and her cinematographer Inti Briones clearly share a strong visual eye and a subtle mastery of unsettling mood. But their sophisticated aesthetic deserves to deliver a smarter pay-off message than just another sour insider’s portrait of the indiscreet, charmless bourgeoisie.

In this subtle and atmospheric allegory by first-time feature director Marcela Said, a teenaged girl holidaying at a lake house in southern Chile experiences a bittersweet coming of age as she faces disillusionment in love and confronts the incoherency and intolerance of her affluent family's political views.

Teenaged Manena (Francisca Walker) and her affluent family are holidaying at their lake house in southern Chile. It's a critical summer for Manena — a bittersweet coming of age as she faces disillusionment in love and the reality of her family's incoherent political views. She can also no longer ignore the behaviour of her father, Pancho (Gregory Cohen), who spends his time obsessed with ridding "his" lake of its carp, which he insists is a foreign infestation of his property. Manena also discovers the plight of the local Mapuche, whose indigenous land claim her family denies. As tensions simmer amongst the isolated forests and lakes, Manena is forced to decide who, and what, she will believe.

Reminiscent of the films of Lucrecia Martel, Marcela Said's debut feature The Summer of the Flying Fish metaphorically depicts the political situation in present-day Chile, and the unequal balance of power that defines it. Through the story of a single family, Said gestures at the attitude of the country's oligarchy towards its indigenous peoples; their revolt is never discussed, and their claims are met with indifference or laughter. Theirs is a struggle that is constantly silenced, and, through Manena, we catch mere glimpses of it.

Atmospheric and evocative, the film's subtle cinematography creates an almost-tactile quality, as the camera stops to ponder decaying animals, hot-water streams, and summer foliage — while the barking of dogs in the distance continuously reminds us of the omnipresent undercurrent of violence. DIANA SANCHEZ